Free shipping on orders above €299.00

We independently select all products and services. If you click through links we provide, Far & Away may earn a commission with no extra cost to you.

Pork Ribs Temperature Guide in 2024

For deliciously juicy and tender pork ribs, aim for an internal temperature ranging from 195°F to 205°F. Remember, it’s essential to cook your ribs beyond the basic ‘done’ temperature of 145°F to truly unlock their scrumptious potential.

When smoking a rack of pork ribs, it takes about 6 hours to cook them properly. However, the cooking time can vary depending on the thickness of the ribs and the smoker’s temperature.

Pork Ribs Internal Temperature Chart

Here is a temperature chart that can help you determine when your pork ribs are cooked to perfection:

Doneness LevelInternal Temperature
Rare145°F
Medium160°F
Well Done170°F
Fall-Off-The-Bone195°F – 205°F

It is important to note that the temperature range for fall-off-the-bone pork ribs is between 195°F and 205°F, which is higher than the safe internal temperature of 145°F. By cooking your pork ribs to this temperature range, you can achieve tender, juicy, and flavorful meat.

Ideal Internal Temperature

The ideal internal temperature for pork ribs is between 195°F and 205°F. This temperature range causes the fat and collagen to melt and turn into gelatin, resulting in tender and delicious ribs. To determine the internal temperature, use a meat thermometer and insert it into the thickest part of the ribs without hitting any bones.

Safe Minimum Temperature

According to the USDA, the safe minimum temperature for cooking pork is 145°F. However, it is not recommended to eat pork ribs at this temperature as the rib tissues have not begun breaking down yet, resulting in less tender and less flavorful meat. The ideal temperature for tender and juicy pork ribs is between 195°F and 205°F. At this temperature range, the tissue starts to break down into gelatin, resulting in a more tender and flavorful meat. Here is a quick guide to pork ribs’ internal temperatures and doneness:

  • 145°F: Safe minimum temperature, but not nearly as tender
  • 165°F: Tissue starts to break down into gelatin
  • 195°F to 205°F: Ideal temperature for tender and juicy pork ribs

Checking Doneness

There are several ways to check if your pork ribs are done cooking. The most accurate and reliable method is to use a meat thermometer or digital meat thermometer. It’s important to probe the cooked pork ribs correctly to get an accurate reading. The thermometer should be inserted into the thickest part of the rib meat, avoiding touching the bones, as the temperature of the meat is what we’re measuring, not the bones. Checking the temperature in a few different places ensures that the rib meat is cooked perfectly throughout.

Another method to check doneness is the toothpick test. Take a toothpick and slowly stick it into the rib meat, between the bones. If it goes in without any resistance, the ribs are done. The bend test is another option. Lift the ribs at one end with a pair of tongs. If they bend easily, and the meat begins to crack, they’re ready. The twist test involves taking a rib at the end of the slab and twisting it. If the bone starts to pull away from the meat with little effort, the ribs are good to go.

It’s important to test in different areas to cook ribs for an even cook, and feel free to use the additional techniques above as a backup. The toothpick, bend, and twist tests are not as accurate as a meat thermometer, but they can still give you a good idea of whether your pork ribs are done cooking.

Cooking Times and Methods

When it comes to cooking pork ribs, slow cooking is the way to go. There are two popular methods for cooking pork ribs: grilling and smoking.

Grilling

Grilling pork ribs is a great option if you don’t have a smoker. Here are the steps to follow for perfectly grilled ribs:

  • Preheat your grill to a low temperature, around 275°F-300°F.
  • Cook the ribs meat side up for about 1.5-2 hours for baby back ribs or 2-2.5 hours for spare ribs.
  • Use a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature, aiming for 195-205°F.
  • Remove the ribs from the grill, let them rest for 10 minutes, and then serve.

Smoking

Smoking pork ribs is considered the best way to cook them if you want that deep, smoky flavor. Here are the steps to follow for perfectly smoked ribs:

  • Preheat your smoker to 225°F.
  • Smoke the ribs meat side up for about 3-4 hours for baby back ribs or 4-5 hours for spare ribs.
  • Optionally, you can wrap your ribs using the 3-2-1 ribs recipe.
  • Use a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature of the ribs. Aim for 195-205°F.
  • Let the ribs rest, slice, and serve.

By following these cooking times and methods, you can create tender, juicy, and flavorful pork ribs.

Baby Back Ribs vs. Spare Ribs

When it comes to cooking ribs, the two most popular types are baby back ribs and spare ribs. Both can be delicious when cooked correctly, but they have some key differences.

Baby Back Ribs

Baby back ribs are smaller and more tender than spare ribs, with a milder flavor. They come from the upper part of the ribcage near the backbone and typically have 10-13 ribs per rack, weighing around two pounds. While they have less meat on the bones compared to spare ribs, they are more expensive.

Spare Ribs

Spare ribs are larger and have more flavor than baby back ribs, but they are also less tender. They come from the lower part of the pig’s ribcage near the belly and typically have 11-13 ribs per rack, weighing around three pounds. Spare ribs are generally cheaper than baby back ribs.

In summary, baby back ribs are smaller, more tender, and have a milder flavor, while spare ribs are larger, more flavorful, but less tender. The choice between the two depends on personal preference and the desired outcome of the dish.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the ideal temperature for cooking pork ribs?

The ideal internal temperature for cooking pork ribs is between 190°F and 203°F. This temperature range yields juicy and tender meat. The type of ribs, their thickness, and the amount of fat can influence cooking times. Various tests, such as the bounce, cut, toothpick, timing, and twist tests, can help determine when ribs are perfectly cooked.

How do you know when pork ribs are done with a thermometer?

The best internal temperature for pork ribs is approximately 200°F. It is recommended to cook all cuts of pork ribs to an internal temperature between 198°F and 202°F. Unfortunately, taking an accurate internal temperature in pork ribs is a difficult proposition due to thin layers of meat and interspersed bones. However, a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat between the bones can give you a good indication of the temperature.

How to tell if pork ribs are done without a thermometer?

If you do not have a thermometer, there are several ways to tell if pork ribs are done. One way is to use the bend test. Pick up the slab of ribs with tongs and gently bounce them. If the meat starts to crack on the surface, it is likely that the ribs are done. Another way is to use the toothpick test. Insert a toothpick into the meat between the bones. If it slides in and out easily, the ribs are done.

What is the internal temperature for St. Louis ribs?

St. Louis ribs are a type of pork rib that is trimmed to a rectangular shape. The ideal internal temperature for cooking St. Louis ribs is the same as other types of pork ribs, between 190°F and 203°F.

What is the USDA recommended internal temperature for pork ribs?

The USDA recommends cooking pork to an internal temperature of 145°F with a three-minute rest time. However, this temperature is not ideal for cooking pork ribs. The ideal internal temperature for cooking pork ribs is between 190°F and 203°F.

What is the 3-2-1 method for cooking pork ribs and what is the internal temperature at the end of the process?

The 3-2-1 method is a popular technique for cooking pork ribs. It involves cooking the ribs for 3 hours unwrapped, 2 hours wrapped in foil, and 1 hour unwrapped again. The internal temperature of the ribs at the end of this process should be between 190°F and 203°F. This method is designed to create tender, fall-off-the-bone ribs.

Share

Leave a Comment